Tagged: manuscript

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Are You A Victim of Goal Setting? by Carol Malone

In a previous article, I explained how the whole notion of goal setting and I got off in the wrong foot. I feared the whole system of goal setting and didn’t trust myself to know what goal to set nor how to accomplish it.

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Q&A with Hugh Tipping

Please welcome Hugh Tipping to our Featured Q&A series at Writer’s Fun Zone. If you’d like to be considered for an interview, check out our guidelines here.

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Your Book in Five Words or Less: Your Title by Kay Keppler

You’ve finished your book. After all the hard work, you need a great title. But writing a title is a lot different from writing a full-length novel or even a short story. Writing a title takes creativity, but it isn’t storytelling—it’s marketing. Your potential readers see a title before they see anything in chapter one, and it has to hook them. Companies spend fortunes on finding the right name for new products—names that will resonate with consumers—and so should you.

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Accountability Using Google Spreadsheets by Raina Schell

A few months ago I decided on an exercise challenge. After two years of bi-weekly handstand classes I still could not balance on my own in the center of the room. After asking experts I was told, “you need to practice every single day no matter what, for a minimum of two minutes a day. If you do this, in six months to a year you’ll have your handstands.”

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Say That Again: Writing Dialogue by Kay Keppler

People talk to each other all the time, so it seems as though writing dialogue should be simple. But many writers trip up over making dialogue sound natural. Here’s a sample of something I see frequently when I’m editing manuscripts:

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Playing Games With Your Characters’ Emotional Spaces by Wyatt Bessing

There are multiple kinds of truth, in fiction as in life. As fiction writers, we move as close to the truth as possible without ever quite veering into truth entirely (otherwise we’d be writing nonfiction). One kind of truth emanates from a realism of scene and detail. By identifying with familiar settings and character traits, readers are pulled into a story and become personally attached to it.