Tagged: guest writer

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The Challenge of Genre Mixing by Michael Finberg

To make a big splash in today’s literary world, genre mixing is essential to a writer. Like a chemist, contrarian writers must mix many story elements to produce a powerful and fresh literary work. Premise and POV (point of view) must be chosen first, but then another critical choice awaits the writer.

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Termination Right 101 by Kelley Way

I’ve had several occasions now where I’m talking to an author, and they mention how frustrating it is that this publisher has the rights to their book and, for one reason or another, the publisher refused to give the rights back when the author asked for it. I promptly ask the first question that comes to my mind: “So, do you think you’ll exercise your termination right when the time comes?”

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Characters and Their Sensory Limitations: POV and Description by Susanne Lakin

Few writers pay much attention to character placement, but this is something of paramount concern to filmmakers, and a subject I cover in depth in Shoot Your Novel. A director has to lay out his camera shots, deciding when a close-up shot would be more effective than a long shot, for example. He may want the camera positioned far away from the action, to make details unclear and evoke curiosity or misinterpretation. Or he may have an extreme close-up to ensure viewers don’t miss a tiny detail that is crucial to the plot.

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Leveraging Limitations for Greater Creativity and Productivity by Brian James Lane

Often times, you may hear that to be successful in your creative endeavors you need to “think outside the box”. This is sound advice. There is nothing more infinite than what is outside the conventional. There is also nothing more boundless than the blank page. Sometimes, creativity may need to be reined in so as not to be overwhelmed. What better place than a box to give your inspiration some form? A small box.